Sermon Bible Study Guides

in Jonah

Jonah 4 - 14th August 2022

OBSERVATION
What does it say?

  1. Read Jonah chapter 4.
  2. Do you notice any repeated words or ideas in these chapters?
  3. What things is God in control of in this chapter? ("God appointed...")
  4. How is Jonah's response to Ninevah's repentance different than God's response in Jonah 3:10?
  5. How do Jonah's emotions change throughout this Jonah 4?

INTERPRETATION
What does it mean?

  1. Why did God's relenting "displease Jonah exceedingly"?
    1. Did Jonah know how God would respond to Ninevah's repentance?
    2. Jonah seems to be angry at God's own character. Why is Jonah's anger unjust?
    3. Was God merciful and slow to anger with Jonah?
  2. After describing God's character in verse 2, Jonah concludes that it's better for him to die than to live. Why do you think Jonah felt so strongly?
    1. God seems to ask a rhetorical question in verse 4 and 9. What is the answer?
    2. Why do you think God asked Jonah this question? What did He want Jonah to understand?
  3. Compare Jonah pitying the plant to God pitying Ninevah
    1. Why did Jonah pity the plant which perished?
    2. Why did God pity Ninevah?
    3. What does this teach us about what God is like?

APPLICATION
How should it change us?

  1. What is something in your own life that has made you "exceedingly displeased" recently?
    1. Did you go to the Lord in prayer about it? One redeeming quality of Jonah in this chapter is that he does go to God in honest prayer.
    2. How does knowing God's character help you to understand the difficulties you face?
  2. Think about the last time you were angry. What did your anger help you to accomplish?
    1. Have you ever been angry and done something you regret?
    2. Read James 1:20. This was true for Jonah, and it's true for us today.
    3. How can you be slower to anger this week?
  3. A few times in Jonah, we see "pagans" show care for those who might perish (Jonah 1:6, Jonah 1:14, Jonah 3:9). But Jonah seems to only care for himself.
    1. In the world today, do you see non-Christians caring for those who are perishing? Do they ever seem to care for them more than Christians do?
    2. What is one way that Christians might be more concerned over their own well-being than the well-being of others?
  4. Pray in light of this passage and about any applications you have made
  5. Sing His Mercy is More to God and to one another.

Psalm 122 - 16th July 2021

OBSERVATION
What does it say?

  1. Read Psalm 122
  2. What feeling(s) does the psalmist express?
  3. Do you see any similarities between this Psalm and the previous Psalms of Ascent? (Psalm 120, 121)
  4. Does the psalmist give any commands?
  5. Do you see any repeated words or poetic devices?

INTERPRETATION
What does it mean?

  1. Why do you think the psalmist was glad about going to the house of the Lord?
  2. What is the "house of the Lord"? 
  3. In verses 3-5, the Psalmist is "looking around" Jerusalem.
    1. What do you think it means that Jerusalem is "bound firmly together"?
    2. What do you think it means that "thrones of judgment were set" in Jerusalem?
  4. How does the church carry out the tasks of the temple? (1 Peter 2:4-5; Ephesians 2:19-22)
  5. Is there anything in this passage that points to or foreshadows truths of the gospel? (Remember there might be many answers to this question: does it mirror Jesus in any way? Anything pointing to sin, judgment, salvation, God's love, etc.?)
    1. How many connections can you make? 

APPLICATION
How should it change us?

  1. The psalmist was glad and excited to gather with "the tribes of the Lord".
    1. How does your family usually prepare for gathering and worshiping with God's people (the church)?
    2. How can we better prepare our hearts in our anticipation and joy in gathering?
    3. What can we do throughout the week to better prepare for the corporate gathering of our church?
  2. How can we use this Psalm to pray for our church and for other churches?